FIGURE GROUND VASE

Figure and ground – blelb start


The best-known example of an ambiguous figure-ground display is Rubin’s vase-faces stimulus; an adaptation of the original image is shown in Figure 6. However, as someone who has also worked on figure-ground perception for a long time, it • We agree it is hard not to see both the face profiles and the vase simultaneously. In 1915 Edgar Rubin discovered the Peter & Paul Goblet which illustrates the principle of alternating figure and ground. This will appear to be an
Figure and ground - blelb start

Greek Vases Part 1 « Substantive Education


When you see the faces as figure, the vase is the ground. When you see the vase as figure, the faces are the ground. The figure/ground relationship is so Figure-Ground Perception separate figure from ground. In some cases, these stimuli involve simple ambiguous figures like the famous face-vase figure that Red-figure vases slowly replaced the black-figure style. Sometimes larger vessels were engraved as well as painted. White-ground pottery was a product of the
Greek Vases Part 1 « Substantive Education

Pottery; Fantoni (Marcello), Vase, Sgraffito, Figure in Landscape


What do you see here? Do you see the profiles of two heads or a vase? Notice how the image fluctuates between the two possibilities even though the image on your The most famous demonstration of figure/ground reversal is the faces/vase illusion: We can see this figure either as two faces, or as a vase. When we see it as a vase in the 5th century B.C., while many artists were making red-figure vases, some artists were experimenting with a new technique of painting figures on a white ground.
Pottery; Fantoni (Marcello), Vase, Sgraffito, Figure in Landscape

Reversible figures – Psychology Department, Ritsumeikan University


Alternative illustrations of figure/ground relationships may be seen in the classic Gestalt "Vase/Faces" picture on the left, or from this example offered in the Korb Face Vase In this illusion the figure and the ground are reversible in all ways. This drawing exemplifies one of the key aspects of figure-ground organization, edge-assignment and its effect on shape perception. Notice in the faces/vase drawing below
Reversible figures - Psychology Department, Ritsumeikan University

Greek Red Figure Pottery Vases – Ancient Greece for Kids!


Rubin's vase (sometimes known as the Rubin face or the figure–ground vase) is a famous set of ambiguous or bi-stable (i.e., reversing) two-dimensional forms Rubin's vase (sometimes known as the Rubin face or the Figure-ground vase) is a famous set of The three main techniques for decorating Greek painted vases were black-figure, red-figure and white-ground. The painters used a complex procedure that involved preparing
Greek Red Figure Pottery Vases - Ancient Greece for Kids!

Figure-ground perception – Scholarpedia


Gestalt figure/ground theory states that the arbitrary study how people separate figure from ground. One of these stimuli is the ambiguous figure the famous face-vase C. Rubin’s vase/face display The Gestalt figure-ground-first assumption arose as a counter-argument to the Structuralist view of visual perception. The various cues that are used in depth perception in psychology, plus figure ground and at this picture, you will see either two faces looking at each other or a vase.
Figure-ground perception - Scholarpedia

The Active Viewer – Aberystwyth University – Home


Figure-ground organization is probably best known by the faces-vase drawing that Rubin Images such as this are ambiguous concerning figure and ground. Is the figure a white vase (or goblet, or bird-bath) on a black background or silhouetted profiles on This kind of ambiguous illusion is called a "figure-ground reversal" because we think of the goblet figure as part of the fore-ground and the faces as
The Active Viewer - Aberystwyth University - Home

Rubin vase – Psychology Wiki


One of the first psychologists to have been intensely concerned with figure and ground was Edgar Rubin from Denmark. The well-known vase-face image was named after him Figure-ground perception from separate figure from ground. In some cases, these stimuli involve simple ambiguous figures like the famous face-vase figure that Beazley, John D. Attic Red-Figure Vase-Painters. Oxford: Clarendon Press Mertens, Joan R. "Attic White-Ground Cups: A Special Class of Vases." Metropolitan Museum Journal
Rubin vase - Psychology Wiki

Design Notes: Ambiguous Figure/Ground – Daphne – A Palomar College


Rubin vase: An example of figure-ground perception. John smithson 2007 / Wikimedia Commons <Rubin's goblet (Rubin's vase; Rubin's vase-face illusion)> (This image is poorly be in front of the white background. This is the most famous image among Figure-ground White-ground technique is a style of ancient Greek vase painting in which figures appear on a white background. It developed in the region of Attica.
Design Notes: Ambiguous Figure/Ground - Daphne - A Palomar College

Pair of Stus of Greek Black-Figure Vases


This illusion is created by the inversion of figure and ground. A well-renowned figure example is Rubin’s Vase, developed by psychologist Edgar Rubin. Rubin's vase (sometimes known as the Rubin face or the figure–ground vase) is a famous set of ambiguous or bi-stable (i.e., reversing) two-dimensional forms Lekythoi and other white-ground vases; Attic "bilingual" pottery, one side in black figure, the other in red figure; Work by Lysippides (black figure) and Andokides (red
Pair of Stus of Greek Black-Figure Vases